Top 10 Strangest Things In Space

The Himiko Cloud

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If there has ever been any object that has shown us the origins of a primordial galaxy, this is it. The Himiko Cloud is the most massive object ever found in the early universe, and it dates to only 800 million years after the Big Bang. The Himiko Cloud astounds scientists with its sheer size, roughly half that of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Himiko belongs to what is known as the “reionization epoch,” or the period from around 200 million to one billion years after the Big Bang—and it’s the first glimpse scientists have managed to get of the early formation of galaxies. To make it even cooler, it has been introduced as the “Giant Mystery Blob Discovered Near the Dawn of Time” by Space.com.

 

The Universe’s Largest Water Reservoir

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Twelve billion light years away, the universe’s largest water reservoir resides in the heart of a quasar. Containing 140 trillion times the amount of water in Earth’s oceans, and found near the colossal black hole at the center of the quasar, the water unfortunately manifests itself in the form of a massive cloud of gas, several hundred light years in diameter—our dreams of the universe’s most kick-ass water slide have been destroyed!

But the kicker is that this black hole, twenty billion times the size of our sun, is constantly spewing out huge amounts of energy—equivalent to what would be produced by 1000 trillion suns.

The Universe’s Largest Electrical Current

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Only a few years ago, scientists stumbled upon an electrical current of cosmic proportions: 10^18 amps, or roughly one trillion lightning bolts. With that kind of power, you could even use that pesky seven-blade electric razor you have lying around!

The lightning is thought to originate from an enormous black hole in the center of the galaxy, which has a core that is supposedly a “huge cosmic jet.” Apparently, the black hole’s huge magnetic field allows it to fire up this lightning bolt through gas and dust to a distance of over one hundred and fifty thousand light years away. And we thought that our galaxy was big—this single lightning bolt is one and a half times the size of it.

 

The LQG

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So yeah, the Himiko Cloud is pretty big—like, half the size of our galaxy. Big whoop, right? Well, what about a structure in space so enormous that it breaks the conventional laws for modern astronomy? This structure, my friends, is the LQG—the Large Quasar Group.

Our galaxy, the Milky Way, is only one hundred thousand light years across. Think about that for a moment; if something happens on the far side of the galaxy, it would take a hundred thousand years for the light to reach the opposite end. That means that when we watch an event take place at the other end of our galaxy, it actually occurred when the human species was just beginning to form.

Now, take that length of time, and multiply it by forty thousand. That’s right—the Large Quasar Group is four billion light years across. The cluster of seventy-four quasars actually breaks the rules of standard astrophysics, since the maximum size of any cosmic structure should be only 1.2 billion light years across.

Scientists have absolutely no idea how this huge structure formed, since they had previously only been aware of other clusters of perhaps several hundred million light years across. The gargantuan structure absolutely spits on a certain physical law, which states that when viewed from a distance, the universe would look relatively uniform. This is exactly the type of condescending cosmic structure that looks over at our galaxy and, with a smirk, says “cute.”

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